The song must further the story

At present, I have the tremendous good fortune to be spending a few days visiting a friend in Honolulu – I know, life’s tough. On the way over on the flight from Sydney I couldn’t get this song from the Disney movie Moana out of my head.

For those of you who don’t have small children, you may be blessedly unaware of this song…until now. You’re welcome for the ear-worm!

Having this song on infinite repeat for around 9 hours reminded me of a saying attributed to Walt Disney which I used in a workshop a few weeks ago. The workshop was part of a research project I’m involved in with the RAAF and myself and my colleagues were facilitating a workshop about the use of blended learning tools in learning design. One of the participants asked how to select the right tools for the job which prompted me to remark that Walt Disney once said that the songs in Disney movies are not just there for the music but they must also be there to further the story. The clip above from Moana is a good example of this. In the song, Maui, the demi-God of the wind and sky, sings a song with gives his back story and legend for viewers who are not familiar with it in a catchy, fast, and easy to understand way through the song.

In the same way, the tools that we use when designing learning initiatives must also “tell the story” of the learning. Often the new and shiny blended or online learning tool (Kahoots anyone?) is used because it’s just there, or it’s exciting, or managers want it used maybe because they’ve paid a lot for it). It’s important to stop at such points in the learning design process and ask how that tool or approach will further the learning goals – how does it help you to tell your learning story? If it doesn’t push your learning story forward, do you need it? Is there something similar but more effective that you could use instead? The tools that you select may be catchy and appeal to learners initially, but their enthusiasm may pall once they realise that there is an activity or tool there more for the sake of it than for any real pedagogical benefit. Effective learning design should help the learners meet their learning goals in the most coherent and engaging way possible, whether or not the tools used are new and shiny. What you end up with may not necessarily be Shiny but it may well do a better job for the learners.

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4 thoughts on “The song must further the story

  1. Great, now I have Shiny stuck in my head… thanks!

    Excellent advice, I’ll be sure to remember this when talking to my academics!

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